100 words 100 days: Day 88: A meal with the five people who have inspired you the most

My mother.

My father.

L. M. Montgomery.

Roald Dahl.

Maya Angelou.

And Jesus. There had to be room for Him at this supper. And I can definitely fit six people in my house- there is enough space for that number. However, they won’t all be able to sit at the table, unless I rearrange the furniture.

I think Jesus might steal the limelight. Everybody will want to talk to Him and ask Him questions.

Still, you can learn a lot just by listening. I bet Roald Dahl would find a way to twist the story. Maya Angelou would kiss her words and breathe poetry into them. L. M. Montgomery would battle with her own demons to bask in the glory of the Saviour her husband would have preached about. And my parents? They would help me cook, and set the table, and probably ask a couple of questions, their humility and goodness shining through, 1-carat diamonds beside a crown jewel.

And Jesus would smile, and suffer the little children to come unto Him.

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Day 89: Write a funny how-to

100words 100 days Day 87: Open a book to the 153rd page. Look at the third line. Make that the start of your story.

Every feather in its long tail had a decorated eye.

But that wasn’t the only reason the dreamcatcher was the most eerie thing I had ever seen. It exuded a translucent plasma-like quality similar to a ghost or a jellyfish. And in its centre, nestled among the threads wrapped around a discarded bangle, was a very large spider, the brown, furry kind. It had already begun weaving its strands across the hoop.

Everything about the dreamcatcher made me feel like it was observing me, preparing to snare me in its little web, and hold me in a world that was not quite real and not quite imagined. Whoever had made it had done so with the intention of subverting the true purpose of a dreamcatcher, with the express intention of making me feel the negativity that seeped from it.

If only I could reach it to take it down!

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Day 88: A meal with the five people who have inspired you the most

100 words100days (ish) Day 86: A manual for an exotic pet

I tried keeping a couple of snails as pets when I was a child. They were the kind that were abundant during the monsoons in Goa. Sludgy, squishy, interesting creatures, with bodies the colour of doce bhaji (similar to oats porridge), and translucent, fragile shells in a light earthy brown.

How to look after these amazing and environmentally important creatures:

  1. It’s better that you don’t keep them as pets. They are not domestic or domesticated.
  2. If you have taken them from their natural habitat because you are trying to conserve them, make sure you put them in a safe place, i.e. preferably one they can’t get out of only to be stepped on.
  3. Take some leaves from the plant you found them on- at least you know they eat that.
  4. Do your research. And record any observations you make.
  5. Don’t pick them up all the time. It just triggers their shrinking reflex (scientific term not googled)

Postscript: If you think you can look after a peacock or a panther, I need to tell you- you’re probably wrong. We really need to stop messing with ecosystems. Please adopt a dog or a cat.

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Day 87: Open a book to the 153rd page. Look at the third line. Make that the start of your story.

I picked up I sweep the sun off rooftops, by Hanan Al-Shaykh, from my To Read pile.

The line I got, serendipitously enough, is about peacocks. But does it have to be?

“Every feather in its long tail had a decorated eye…”

Day 85: Why MOOC’s do (or don’t) work

It’s been a long while between the last 100 days post and this one. In fact, I think it’s been more than a hundred days.

Just 16 posts to go to actually complete this (perfect timing- this exercise will help me get in the groove for NaNoWriMo)

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A Massive Open Online Course is one that is open to people all over the world, broadcast via the levelling medium of the Internet.

As is the case with most methods and media of learning, MOOC’s work in specific situations, with specific audiences.

If, for instance, someone signs up for a MOOC because he/she is truly interested in the topic, the MOOC will definitely benefit that person more than someone who is vaguely intrigued by the syllabus.

For a MOOC to benefit you, you have to be willing to put in the time and do the work. Nobody is going to chase after you to complete your quizzes or peer reviews. A MOOC is an instance of self-directed learning.

It’s not just about motivation and curiosity: not having access to the internet is a big obstacle to participating effectively in a MOOC.

From a trainer’s perspective, a MOOC may not work in the following situations:

  1. There’s no system to follow up with your trainees post the MOOC in order to ensure transfer of learning
  2. Trainees are forced to watch the videos, and complete coursework, thus leading to sub-par participation and retention
  3. The MOOC is not customised to the requirements of the organisation. (Some people can apply what they have learned in a different setting, some can’t)

Whether you are a learner or a trainer, if you don’t try new methods, you’ll never know. Go MOOC!

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Day 86: A manual for an exotic pet